The Seventies
 

No. 2 of 3 in the Howe/Stammers/Walker Decade books series
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By:David J. Howe, Mark Stammers & Stephen James Walker
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Editions:  UK (hardback) | UK (paperback)

Cover image for The Seventies
Edition: UK (hardback)
Released:  November 1994
Publisher:  Virgin
ISBN:1-85227-444-1
Format: hardback
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Cover blurb:
By the same authors:

The Sixties

'One of the best books about television ever'

Stage & TV Today

'This will probably rank as the ultimate book on the subject'

Doctor Who Magazine

The Handbooks

'Well written, well researched, and a joy to read'

TV Zone

Inside dustjacket flaps read as follows:

By the end of the nineteen-sixties the BBC television programme Doctor Who had enthralled a generation of children. The police telephone box and the staccato-voiced Daleks had become household icons, monsters and aliens had lurched and glided across flickering black-and-white TV screens every Saturday at tea time.

In January 1970 Doctor Who returned for a new season — and burst into living rooms in full colour and with a new, dynamic actor in the starring role.

Doctor Who and its audience were starting to grow up.

The Seventies is the definitive record of Doctor Who's second decade. Jon Pertwee was followed as the Doctor by Tom Baker, who brought to the part a personality that was even more flamboyant than Pertwee's and who created one of television's most charismatic and memorable characters.

Advances in technology produced more believable monsters and more spectacular special effects and made location filming much easier.

Doctor Who became more popular than ever, with adults outnumbering children in the continuously climbing audience figures.

The fascination with Doctor Who continued to generate hundreds of spin-off products; large-scale exhibitions were mounted; and organisations of fans started to proliferate.

The Seventies is a meticulous record of Doctor Who's most momentous decade, and is illustrated throughout with an unrivalled collection of colour photographs, most of which have never been publishing before.

David J Howe, Mark Stammers and Stephen James Walker have spent many years researching and writing about Doctor Who for magazines, both professional and amateur, as well as contributing to books about the series and other cult television programmes.

Books by the same authors:

By David J. Howe, Mark Stammers and Stephen James Walker:

THE SIXTIES

THE HANDBOOK: THE FIRST DOCTOR

THE HANDBOOK: THE FOURTH DOCTOR

THE HANDBOOK: THE SIXTH DOCTOR

By David J Howe:

TIMEFRAME

Edited by Mark Stammers and Stephen James Walker:

DECALOG

Cover image for The Seventies
Edition: UK (paperback)
Released:  November 1995
Publisher:  Virgin
ISBN:0-86369-871-9
Format: paperback
Owned:
Buy:
Order from Amazon.co.uk
New:  £90.32
Used:  £7.52
Order from Amazon.com
New:  $69.99
Used:  $4.38
Order from Amazon.ca(Unable to fetch price)
eBay

Cover blurb:
By the end of the 1960s the BBC television programme Doctor Who had enthralled a generation of children. The police telephone box and the staccato-voiced Daleks had become household icons; watching the flickering black-and-white images of alien monsters and marvels had become a Saturday teatime ritual for millions.

In January 1970 Doctor Who returned for a new season — and burst into living rooms in full colour and with a new, dynamic actor in the starring role.

Jon Pertwee was followed as the Doctor by Tom Baker, whose flamboyance during his seven-year tenure ensured that the Doctor would be confirmed as one of TV's most memorable characters.

Meanwhile, advances in technology produced more believable monsters and more spectacular special effects. More and more scenes were filmed on location. Doctor Who became more popular than ever, with adults now outnumbering children in the continuously rising audience.

The Seventies is the definitive record of Doctor Who's second decade. It is illustrated in full colour throughout the book with an unrivalled collection of historic photographs.

David J Howe, Mark Stammers and Stephen James Walker have spent many years researching and writing about Doctor Who. Together they have written The Sixties, described by Stage & TV Today as 'one of the best books about television ever', and the Handbook series of paperbacks about the original Doctors. David J Howe created Timeframe, the glorious colour scrapbook celebrating 30 years of Doctor Who, while Mark Stammers and Stephen James Walker have edited the first two Decalog collections of short fiction.

'Exquisitely designed and packed with rare full-colour photographs.' TV Zone

'A magnificent work of both research and presentation ... another winner.' Doctor Who Magazine


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